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Verify information about the cattery on the web site of the association the breeder belongs to ( TICA,CFA, etc.) Associations are advertising only catteries which are truly members of their association. Ideally if cattery has advertizement add on TICA web site.
Check the references ( blog) which reliable breeders place on their web sites. Look for positive feed back but not Testimonials which they place on the web site themselves and choose the good ones only, but other websites which provides space for such feed back.
Make sure there are pictures of cats/kittens in their new homes on the web site. normally, people are shearing these with the breeder. Pictures of parents
There are a lot of back yard breeders who would may charge less than the real breeder but they also not going to give you any warranty if anything happen to your kitten and , of course, would not offer any replacement in any cases. They do not test their breeding stock and not obtaining any cats show. Ask if a breeder is offering paperwork for your kitten future registration in any of the association and in contract there is a language about it. Check your responsibilities and breeder's promisses regarding paperwork. Your contract is legal document which had power in any court. Also, keep e-mail conversation because this is all legal proof for both sides.
IF THE PRICE TOO LOW - THIS IS A GOOD SIGN OF POSSIBLE SCAMMERS!
MYTHS & FACTS ABOUT SPAYING OR NEUTERING
The animal population is exploding. Each year millions of unwanted pets are born and most are treated like "living garbage" and disposed of. The primary causes of pet euthanasia are the failure of owners to have their pets spayed or neutered and animals that are abandoned or relinquished to shelters because of obedience problems. Only responsible breeder can give you a warranty that parents of your kitty genetically healthy which illuminates lot of health issues with your pet in the future, give you a warranty or replacement if such problems occurs and make sure your new kitten is properly raised and socialized. All of this is very important for your satisfaction and joy from you had purchased for your money spend.
FACTS ABOUT DECLAWING
Unlike most mammals who walk on the soles of the paws or feet, cats are digitigrades, which means they walk on their toes. Their back, shoulder, paw and leg joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments and nerves are naturally designed to support and distribute the cat's weight across its toes as it walks, runs and climbs. There is no such thing as "GENTLY DECLAWING". With declawing part of cat's fingers are being removed, not the claws only. Your breeder will help you with the information on how to help your kitty to find proper place for their natural needs without scarifying your furniture. With some of your help it is not hard to achieve. Treeming your kitty claws is something you should consider doing and this should be regular procedure with rewarding pleasant experience for your furry friend. There is no way around.
COMMON HEALTH CONCERNS IN AN OVERWEIGHT CAT
Concerned about how round your cat has become, or even notice your cat losing weight too quickly? It's easy for people to realize they've gained too much when their pants get a little snug. When it comes to a feline friend, however, it's up to you to watch for warning signs that she's a little too fluffy. These signs are decreasing activity level, when kitty get tired fast, hard to fill ribs due to fat ( not muscles) around them, etc. You need to manage your kitty weight yourself. Do not expect from your veterinarian to tell you that you kitty is overweight. They, normally, won't tell you.
Also, some breeds of cats tend to gain too much weight and British Shorthair is one of them. The gaining weight, normally, starts after your kitty altered and this is time when you should consider diet change, amount of food change to keep your kitty in perfect weight condition for the best health of your kitty.
PROBLEM OF KITTEN MORTALITY
Kitten mortality is a distressing, as well as an economic problem, which occurs to some extent in any breeding program. A study by Scott et all, 1976, of over 3,000 kittens in over 800 litters indicated 34.5% mortality between birth and one year, which is a considerable number.